Helen Hanson, “Putting “Rebecca” on Trial: Daphne du Maurier and Hollywood’s mid-century Adaptation Industry”, Tuesday 9th October, 5pm.

Venue: Room 101, 5 University Gardens, Glasgow University.

TLW are thrilled to be hosting Professor Helen Hanson from the University of Exeter on Tuesday 9th October. We can’t wait to hear Prof. Hanson’s talk, “Putting “Rebecca” on Trial: Daphne du Maurier and Hollywood’s mid-century Adaptation Industry.” This is definitely one for our film buffs, and anyone interested in women and film, Daphne du Maurier, Alfred Hitchcock, or film noir. Read on to find out more about what we’ll be discussing on the evening.

As with all our events, this talk is free and open to all. We’re a friendly and welcoming bunch here at TLW, so please do come and join us from 5pm for drinks and refreshments, with the talk beginning at 5.15pm in room 101, 5 University Gardens.

“Putting “Rebecca” on Trial: Daphne du Maurier and Hollywood’s mid-century Adaptation Industry,”

 

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Daphne du Maurier’s novel Rebecca (1938) has continued to grip and seduce its readers in the 80 years since its publication. The novel’s success springs from du Maurier’s brilliant control of her plot, and her bravura evocation of the gothic mood. Rebecca is a sensational story, but with its roots in the long tradition of female gothic literature, it reads like a classic. These qualities made Rebecca a highly attractive property for screen adaptation, and Alfred Hitchcock’s film version released in 1940, was huge critical and box office success; the film won the Oscar for Best Picture and it inaugurated a trend for dark gothic films for women during the 1940s. However, in the background of the film’s success Daphne du Maurier, and the film’s producer David O. Selznick, were fighting a lawsuit which contended that Rebecca infringed copyright. The story of the case, which was eventually resolved in favour of du Maurier, is intriguing. The talk will examine some of the legal documents, correspondence and statements from the legal process, and papers from the Daphne du Maurier archive at the University of Exeter. These documents provide fascinating insights into du Maurier’s writing process, as well as offering a judgement on Rebecca as a novel that is both highly original and part of the wider gothic genre.

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Speaker bio: Professor Helen Hanson is an Associate Professor in Film History at the University of Exeter. She has written widely on the history of American cinema, and she has particular interests in the history of creative processes ‘behind the scenes’ in the Hollywood Studio Era. She is the author of Hollywood Heroines: Women in Film Noir and the Female Gothic Film (2007) and Hollywood Soundscapes: Film Sound Style, Craft and Production in the Classical Era (2017) and the co-editor of The Femme Fatale: Histories, Images, Context and The Companion to Film Noir.

 

 

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“Out of the Shadows”: Forgotten Transatlantic Women Roundtable Discussion

Tuesday 29thMay, 1.30pm, The Kelvin Hall seminar room, free.

It’s a beautiful day in Glasgow, we hope that all our followers have had a chance to get out in the sunshine. Here at TLW HQ the weather has been getting us excited for conference season, and so today we bring you a short post about the TLW Roundtable discussion which we will be hosting at the Glasgow University College of Arts PG Conference on Tuesday the 29thMay.

Laura will be introducing our roundtable discussion by speaking about why she started the Transatlantic Literary Women series. She will also be looking at two forgotten literary women who were overshadowed by male partners or family members: Zelda Fitzgerald and Alice James, as well as Edith Wharton. Sarah will be focusing on Polish-born, Jewish-American writer, Anzia Yezierska and Nella Larsen. She will also exploring how BAME women scholars have recovered forgotten writing, and how essential it is for universities to include diverse curricula. Finally, Saskia will be covering Brazillian writer, Clarice Lispector and African American author, documentary-maker and social activist Toni Cade Bambara.

In addition to the TLW Roundtable, the conference will be hosting a range of excellent keynote speakers and workshops. On Tuesday 29th Dr. Michelle Keown, Senior Lecturer in English Literature (University of Edinburgh), will be kicking off the conference with her keynote address. Wednesday 30thwill see Glasgow University’s own Dr. Benjamin White start the day with his keynote talk ‘Animals in displacement,’ and workshops on Sign Language and Creative Writing. The conference also has a wide and diverse range of papers being presented by an array of panellists over the course of the two days.

We look forward to seeing you all at the roundtable on the 29th, and to the fascinating discussions that will ensue from exploring the achievements of these forgotten women writers.

You can register for the event here (registrations closes on the 17th May), and also head over to the Connections Conference website to see the full programme that the committee have lined up for us, it looks like a great couple of days!

Kari

 

 

 

 

Suffragette Spotlight: Annie Kenney

Ahead of our upcoming Suffrage Centenary Celebration at the People’s Palace Museum (26th and 27th May 1-4pm), the TLW team have been posting weekly blogs about inspiring women who fought for suffrage. Today’s blog focuses on Annie Kenney.

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“As I was one of the leading actors in the first play, so I was one of the leading actors in the last.”
— Annie Kenney, Memories of a Militant

Kenney was born in 1879 to a working-class family near Oldham, and Marie Roberts describes her as “the most readily identifiable representative of working-class women” in the Women’s Social and Political Union (xi). One of eleven children, Kenney went to work in a local cotton-mill when she was ten years-old. Starting out as a ‘half-timer,’ she would work in the morning before going to school in the afternoon. At thirteen years-old she switched to full-time employment in the mill, undertaking shifts as long as twelve hours. It was in this role as a weaver’s assistant that Kenney had one of her fingers torn off.

Kenney continued to work in the mill for 15 years, during which time she helped fellow workers to read, and take an interest in literature. She became involved in the trade union movement, and throughout her life was heavily influenced by Robert Blatchford, the English campaigner and journalist who launched an affordable weekly socialist newspaper called The Clarion.

In 1905, as a member of the Oldham Clarion Vocal Club, Kenney heard Christabel Pankhurst speak. This inspired her to join the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), founded by the Pankhurst family in 1903. In the same year that Kenney joined the WSPU she attended a Liberal rally in Manchester with Christabel, where they repeatedly interrupted Sir Edward Grey to question whether women would be given the right to vote. The two women were removed and later imprisoned for the alleged assault of the police officers who ejected them from the rally. Kenney was imprisoned for three days, the first of thirteen prison sentences throughout her life. In 1913 she was sentenced to a lengthy 18-months which was temporarily interrupted by her release under the Cat and Mouse Act.

Christabel Pankhurst fled to Paris in 1912 to avoid imprisonment, and Kenney was placed in charge of the WSPU in her absence, demonstrating the high degree of influence which she held in the organisation. When the Representation of the People Act was passed in 1918 it granted women over the age of 30 the right to vote if they passed certain property and education requirements. After partial suffrage had been won, Kenney dropped out of political life. She married and gave birth to her son in 1923, and published her autobiography the following year.

Many feel that Kenney’s efforts in the fight for the vote have been “undeservedly neglected,” (Roberts, xv) and this often relates to a further belief held by some that working-class efforts for women’s suffrage have also been overlooked. Krista Cowman voices this in her 2018 article for the New Statesman, stating that “When women finally got the vote, the stories of many working class suffragettes were quickly forgotten. Few of them had the time or contacts needed to publish autobiographies and most could not afford to travel to London for the meetings of the Suffragette Fellowship, a militant old girls’ association that tried to preserve their campaign’s history. As we celebrate the centenary of the Representation of the People Act that gave votes to at least some British women in February 1918, we should remind ourselves of the sacrifices made by many ordinary and anonymous women, who risked their livelihoods and reputations alongside their more affluent companions in the fight for equality and citizenship.”

In exploring the various women to cover for the Suffragette Spotlight series, Kenney seemed a particularly fitting figure as she is an inspirational woman both within and without the context of female suffrage. For a generation of young women today, many of whom have experienced a setback in the age that they can hope to reach traditional life-milestones such as starting a career, a family, or buying property, Kenney is an example of someone who refused to let her age, class, gender, or finances, restrict her aspirations and achievements in life. She became a member of the WSPU when she was in her mid–twenties; arguably her greatest life achievement of helping win women’s suffrage was reached when she was in her late thirties, and she was in her early forties before she married and started a family. Despite having to start work at only ten years-old, she succeeded in educating herself through self-study and correspondence courses – encouraging fellow working-class women to do the same – and reached leadership status in the predominantly middle-class led organisation of the WSPU. She experienced the physical consequences of the dangerous working-conditions in Britain in the late-nineteenth and early twentieth century, but also helped ensure that future generations would have the opportunity to change these conditions by voting for their chosen representatives in government. Kenney exists as both a historical hero who was willing to sacrifice a great deal for a cause she believed in, but also as a rousing reminder that if a woman from her humble background could achieve so much, over a century ago, women today need not let their own goals be limited by the societal expectations which are often imposed on them.

Keep an eye on our website for more blogs like this one, or follow us on Twitter @transatlanticladies using the hashtag #TLWsuffrage. And if you want to learn more about ground-breaking suffragettes, make your own rosettes, and learn about women and the vote, join us at the People’s Palace for an afternoon of crafts, talks, and a look at Glasgow’s suffrage collections!

Kari
References and further reading

Kenney, Annie. Memories of a Militant. London, Edward Arnold & Co., 1924.

Roberts, Marie, and Tamae Mizuta. Perspectives on the History of British Feminism. Routledge/Thoemmes, London, 1994.

Cowman, Krista. “Let’s not forget the working class suffragettes” in New Statesman, 6 February 2018.

Information on Kenney can also obtained from the Working Class Movement Library.

The British Newspaper Archive gives access to articles which mention Kenney.

The Annie Kenney Project is an ongoing campaign to have a statue of Kenney erected in Oldham town square.

Picture courtesy of LSE Library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TLW Film Night, Wednesday 18th April 2018, 5.15pm

Film Night
Wednesday 18th April 2018, 5.15pm
Gilchrist Postgraduate Club, Glasgow University

Those of you who have attended our events in the past will know that we hand out feedback forms asking what you would like to see included in the series’ future events. One of the frequent suggestions that we get is for a film screening, and what with the overdue recognition that is currently being given to women’s role in the film industry, we have been inspired to arrange some film-related events. Not only can we confirm that our very first film screening will take place on Wednesday 18th April, but we also have a fantastic film-related talk in the pipeline after summer! Keep your eyes peeled on the blog and Twitter for updates on the talk.

So, what are we going to be screening on our very first film night? Well, we think that you should have a say in this, so to narrow things down a little we have collated a list of four films to choose from, and created a Twitter Poll. You can read a little about each film below, as well as why they are relevant in celebrating the achievements of women in film. Whether it’s one of your favourite films that you want to re-watch in good company, or if it’s a film that you have been meaning to see for ages, this is your chance . . . get voting!

Lost in Translation (2003)
Sofia Coppola has avoided living in the shadow of her acclaimed father, Francis Ford Coppola, by following her own creative path and paving the way for other female film-makers in the industry. She wrote, directed and produced this highly-acclaimed film which follows the friendship of an actor (Bill Murray) and a college graduate (Scarlett Johansson). Lost in Translation was nominated for numerous Academy Awards, with Coppola winning Best Original Screenplay, and Johansson taking the BAFTA for Best Actress in a Leading Role.

American Honey (2016)
Andrea Arnold is a British filmmaker who some of you may be familiar with through her film Red Road (2006), a Scottish film set in the Red Road high-rise flats in Glasgow. American Honey focuses on a very different world from this, following runaway youth, Star (Sasha Lane), on her journey around the Midwest of America. The film won both the Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, and Best British Film at the BAFTA awards.

Sound of My Voice (2011)
Brit Marling co-wrote, co-produced, and starred in this psychological indie thriller about documentary-makers who go undercover in a Los Angeles cult. Marling has been making her mark on film and television over the last few years with films like Another Earth (2011), The East (2013) and the Netflix series The OA. She has spoken out about what made her start writing roles for women rather conforming to the roles being ascribed in a male-dominated industry. You can read more about this in her response to the Weinstein scandal here.

Morvern Callar (2002)
You may have seen British film-maker Lynne Ramsay’s latest film, You Were Never Really Here (2017), in the cinema right now. Ramsay co-wrote and directed Morvern Callar, and this choice has a bit of a literary theme to it. It was adapted from a book of the same name, and also follows Morvern (Samantha Morton) as she masquerades as the author of an unpublished novel which her boyfriend has left behind before committing suicide. Morton won the BIF award for Best Actress, and the film won the Award of the Youth at Cannes.

All these films are from female filmmakers which have been given award recognition, we hope you like what we have chosen and look forward to seeing which film you pick. The poll closes in a week, so get your votes in while you can! The film night will take place at Gilchrist Postgraduate Club, plus it’s free and open to all (student and public). We will have some snacks and refreshments, and you can also purchase food and alcoholic drinks from the Gilchrist café.

Head over for 5.15pm to join us for a relaxed and welcoming night appreciating women’s achievements in the world of film-making!

Kari and the TLW team.

International Women’s Day competition winner

Happy International Women’s Day from the TLW team!

As you all know, in honour of International Women’s Day, we held a guest blog competition. We are very pleased to announce that the competition winner is Deborah Molloy, with her fascinating and informative piece on Canadian author, Margaret Atwood.  Thank you Deborah, for your wonderful contribution to the blog.

Here is a quick update on the latest TLW news and events:

  • On Saturday 26th – Sunday 27th May we will be collaborating with the People’s Palace Glasgow to hold a Women’s Partial Suffrage Centenary Celebration. You can find out more about this exciting event here.
  • The team are looking forward to hosting a Roundtable discussion on partial suffrage at Glasgow University College of Arts Postgraduate Conference on the 29th. You can keep up to date with the latest from the conference on their WordPress, and if you would like to submit a paper then you still have a day to get your abstracts in!
  • We will be hosting a TLW film screening on Wednesday the 18th of April at the Gilchrist Postgraduate Club, Glasgow University. There will be more details of this announced over the next week, so keep your eyes peeled.
  • Our website has been given a small re-vamp, so you can now browse our past events, and our brand new Press and Reviews page which has links to event reviews as well as this recent article from The Skinny, which featured our book club.

Whether you are doing something special to mark IWD 2018, or quietly contemplating the achievements of women while you are in work, we hope you all have a great day. And if you ask us, there’s no better way to celebrate than by reading Deborah’s winning guest-blog . . . enjoy!

Reflections on Margaret Atwood, Deborah Molloy

I came across the works of Margaret Atwood when I was studying my A levels, long before her current vogue following the success of the TV adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale.  My wonderful teacher chose not to give us that particularly bleak dystopian vision to study, but rather introduced us to her beautiful poetry with “Woman Skating”.  Atwood is probably more famous as a novelist but she has also published seventeen books of poetry, including this unforgettable piece which encapsulates the vision of her mother skating on a frozen Toronto lake.

“On the ice a woman skating,

jacket sudden

red against the white,

concentrating on moving

in perfect circles.”

Intrigued by the visual quality of her poetry, and the evident high esteem of my teacher, I went on to discover her fiction for myself, starting with The Edible Woman.  I had always been an avid reader, and had engaged with a wide range of genres, but this was the first feminist text I had discovered.  I was instantly hooked on her sly satire of the ‘perfect’ wife and the pressures put upon young women to conform in 1950s Canada.  She has a gift for humour, using it to leaven the bitterness of her subject matter, allowing her to highlight the cannibalistic nature of gender relationships through the happy medium of cake.

Margaret Atwood was the first author I discovered to talk about life in the raw, the struggle of being a woman in our society and the survival skills necessary to maintain a female sense of self.  She is a mistress of genre, and can meld historical memoir with science fiction without missing a beat.  Her concern for the environment is evident in much of her work, the futuristic Oryx and Crake trilogy sometimes feels uncomfortably close to coming true with its genetically modified fast food, cybercriminals and all-powerful pharmaceuticals conspiring to engineer the end of the world.  With her talent for capturing the essence of truth, if anyone ever offers you ChickieNobs for dinner then be very afraid.

I was fortunate enough to attend a talk she gave at the Edinburgh International Book Festival a few years ago, speaking with wit and urgency as she read from her then new novel about memory, ageing and our relationship with the past, The Blind Assassin, in which a grandmother tells her life story to her granddaughter, with all the twists and turns we have come to expect from an Atwood novel.   She recently became the inaugural contributor to the Future Library[1], committing an unpublished piece to a cultural time capsule to be printed in a hundred years’ time.  My great grandchildren will have the opportunity to discover this new Atwood treasure, like true time travellers, in 2114 – how I envy them!

Margaret Atwood is my contemporary literary heroine and deserves to be recognised for being a brave female voice for over fifty years.

“A word after a word

After a word is power.”  Spelling, Margaret Atwood

[1] More information about the Future Library Project is available here

 

Deborah Molloy is based in Whitstable, and currently undertaking her PhD at the University of Glasgow, focusing on female mental illness in New York fiction.

 

Forgotten Transatlantic Literary Women: Hollywood novels by women

So far in our blog series on Forgotten Transatlantic Literary Women we have covered a wide range of fascinating and talented writers, including Clarice Lispector, Anzia Yezierska, Lorine Niedecker, and Toni Cade Bambara. Rather than focusing on a specific figure, today I will be looking at two works within a larger genre, the Hollywood novel.

For anyone unfamiliar with the Hollywood novel genre: it began in the 1910’s, continues today, and is made up of novels written about Hollywood and the film industry. At a glance, you would be forgiven for thinking that the genre has predominantly male contributors, as it is a genre in which women’s contributions are frequently overlooked. Most critical studies focus on the most well-known Hollywood novels like Nathanael West’s The Day of the Locust (1939), F. Scott Fitzgerald’s unfinished novel The Last Tycoon (1941), and Budd Schulberg’s What Makes Sammy Run? (1941). One rare female work which is repeatedly recognised is Joan Didion’s first novel Play It as It Lays (1970). Despite the frequent focus on male writing within criticism, bibliographies of the Hollywood novel reveal a surprising amount of works by women. The two examples which I will be discussing today are Frances Marion’s Minnie Flynn (1925), and Katherine Albert’s Remember Valerie March? (1939).

At the beginning of Minnie Flynn, Minnie is a teenage factory girl living with her family in New York. When Minnie becomes romantically involved with a minor actor, she manages to get a foothold in an East Coast film studio. After a rocky start as a struggling extra, Minnie succeeds in ‘making it’ as an actress, and her career takes her to Hollywood. Success doesn’t last, however, and in a tale which is now a familiar Hollywood story, we witness both Minnie’s rise and her fall. Throughout her success, Minnie is consistently reckless with money, worshipping material possessions over all else. She is also taken advantage financially by her friends, family and romantic partners. Though it is difficult to feel sorry for a character who is often arrogant and greedy, Marion still manages to successfully evoke our sympathy in depicting how difficult it can be to distinguish genuine from artificial affection when you are in a position of power, wealth, and celebrity. In Without Lying Down: Frances Marion and the Powerful Women of Early Hollywood (1998), Cari Beauchamp tells us that Marion intended for Minnie Flynn to be ‘a warning to the thousands of women she saw pouring into Hollywood full of optimism and without the slightest idea of what lay ahead’ (154). In addition to depicting the pitfalls of fame, Minnie Flynn acts as a valuable account of the film industry in New York and Hollywood. It also explores the practice of acting, and the relationship between an actress and director.

Frances Marion was a director and screenwriter in early Hollywood, and her own life story is as revealing about early Hollywood as her novel is. Beauchamp tells us that by 1930 Marion had been ‘the highest paid screenwriter in Hollywood – male or female,’ since 1917 (9). Marion was also the winner of two Academy Awards. In 1931 she won the Writing award for The Big House (1930), and two years later the Best Story award for The Champ (1931). Details like these can hardly be lost on a modern audience, given the recent attention on gender pay-gaps in the film industry, and in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein scandal and subsequent #MeToo movement.

The relationship between an actress and her director is a theme which is taken up again in Remember Valerie March? (1939). Katherine Albert’s novel is another rise-and-fall tale of a Hollywood actress, only this time it is narrated from the perspective of her director, Conrad Powers. Powers claims to have both started and ended the acting career of the ‘first lady of film,’ Valerie March. The novel is his own personal account of Valerie’s professional career and personal life, and often takes the form of a Hollywood exposé. Through the character of Powers, Albert explores the way in which a director manipulates the emotions and life-choices of an actress to get the desired performance from her, for the benefit of the film. At one point in the novel, Powers encourages the married Valerie to have an affair with her co-star, with the justification that this will add a more convincing dimension to the film. Albert is not alone in her portrayal of this unhealthy relationship. In the popular 2017 television series Feud: Bette and Joan, this theme is taken up. Feud is about the rivalry between Hollywood stars Bette Davis and Joan Crawford, and takes place largely during the filming of Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962). We see the film’s director, Robert Aldrich, pitting the actresses against each other for the sake of authenticity. Hollywood fan-magazines and gossip columns latch on to the story, and fuel the fire between the two women to increase readership. Though Feud is a dramatized series, there is no doubt that these practices were in play in the industry, as many Hollywood histories depict.

Both Marion and Albert’s novels explore a number of similar themes. For example, both spark interesting questions on different forms of acting, particularly method acting, and what exactly makes a successful and convincing performance. Albert delves further, however, into topics such as the cult of celebrity in America, the role of the press in Hollywood, and work of publicity departments within film studios. It comes as no surprise then, that Albert was also a Hollywood insider. She worked as an actress, a studio publicist for MGM, and a feature and fiction writer for Photoplay, one of the first film fan magazines in America.

The ongoing current debates and discussions over male control within the film-industry have emphasised the unacceptable positions that both men and women have been forced into as a result of an extreme power imbalance. The relevance of Hollywood novels such as Minnie Flynn and Remember Valerie March can’t be underestimated in depicting how people in positions of power can abuse this power, and their employees. Considering Frances Marion and Katherine Albert’s active and varied careers in the film industry, they can also help to represent the achievements of women in that industry. In an era where women are increasingly viewed as under-appreciated in the industry (through both salary and award recognition) this recognition is much needed.

Thanks for reading!

Kari Sund

 

Notes and References

Sadly, these novels are difficult to obtain, particularly Remember Valerie March? I was, however, lucky enough to obtain a beautiful new copy of Minnie Flynn thanks to the fantastic work of The Hollywood Novel Project, run by Ben Smith. You can view the project’s Kickstarter, and the journey of how the first edition of Minnie Flynn in 90 years came into being, through the following link. We eagerly await the next Hollywood novel to be published by this project:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1133736285/frances-marions-lost-novel-minnie-flynn-a-new-edit.

Information on Albert’s role as a Hollywood insider comes from Anthony Slide’s Inside the Hollywood Fan Magazines. A History of Star Makers, Fabricators, and Gossip Mongers. University Press of Mississippi, 2010, pp 77-78.

Information on Frances Marion is taken from Cari Beauchamp’s Without Lying Down: Frances Marion and the Powerful Women of Early Hollywood (1998), a great source for anyone who wants to learn more about women’s achievements in early Hollywood.

 

 

Happy New Year from TLW!

The TLW team would like to wish everyone a Happy New Year! 2017 was a fantastic year for us, and we’d like to thank all of our wonderful followers for coming to our events and helping to make the series what it is! We can’t wait to share what 2018 has in store for TLW, so keep your eyes peeled as we tweet (@atlantlitwomen) and blog about events in the coming months. Expect plenty of interesting talks, book clubs, guest blogs, and much more. The team is particularly looking forward to sharing our series of blogs on overlooked texts by transatlantic women, as well as details of a follow-up online #TLWBookChat. Look out for the first of these posts in the next week!

The 2018 series kicks off with another instalment of our book club, and the chosen novel was voted for by you! It looked like Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper was going to win our Twitter poll, but at the very last minute Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God took the lead. We hope you will join us to talk about Hurston’s novel on Tuesday 16th January at 5.15pm in the Gilchrist Postgraduate Club. As with all our events, the book club is free and open to all. Snacks and refreshments will be provided, so just bring along your copy of the book and enjoy the evening.

Other dates for the TLW diaries: Wednesday 21 February, 5.15. We’re delighted that Gaby Fletcher (National University of Ireland, Galway) will be joining us to talk about Fluffy Ruffles. Intrigued? You will be! Watch this space for more details…

And finally, competition time! The start of 2018 has left us excited for International Women’s Day on Thursday 8th of March, so we decided to make this the theme of our next writing competition. We invite submissions in the form of a blog entry about the woman that you would like to recognise on International Women’s day, telling us why you feel they should be recognised. We welcome pieces on any literary women. This could be your favourite novelist, or perhaps you have a journalist, songwriter, poet, or even a film and television writer who you would like to write about? We can’t wait to hear about the women who have influenced you, and the winning entries will not only be published on our website as a guest blog, but will also win some great prizes! Please submit entries of up to 500 words to us at: transatlantic.women@gmail.com by midnight on Friday 2nd March, providing your name and where you are based.

We can’t wait to see you all at our 2018 events, and we wish you a great start to the year!

Kari, on behalf of the TLW team.