Fluffy Ruffles and the New Woman Cartoon

Fluffy web image

The talk will be on Wednesday 21 February, from 5.15 – 7pm, Rooms 202 and 203, 4 University Gardens, Glasgow.

Season 2 of the Transatlantic Literary Women is well under way, and next up we’re delighted to welcome Gaby Fletcher, from the National University of Ireland, Galway, to give a talk on the New Woman cartoon from the early 20th century, the lively Fluffy Ruffles. I had a preview of this talk recently and can confirm that we’re in for a treat. Join us for this friendly, social event with refreshments and a great talk!

Here are a few words from Gaby Fletcher on the topic:

‘Fluffy Ruffles: debating, reproducing, and fashioning the New Woman’

Fluffy Ruffles was a vivacious, fashionable, and enterprising New Woman cartoon published in the New York Herald during 1907-1909. Drawn by Wallace Morgan and Carolyn Wells, the cartoon created an international sensation when the Herald began a competition to find the real Fluffy Ruffles in America during 1907. In the newspaper, tangible debate ensued about the representation and lived reality of the American New Woman. By explicitly playing with the boundaries of lived and fictional reality, Fluffy Ruffles crafted a form of New Woman that relied on the repeated narration of an idealised female identity.

The New York Herald, and particularly the European edition known as The Paris Herald, carefully crafted a responsive public sphere with its readership.  As an exemplar of this process, Fluffy Ruffles provides a form of cultural narrative that can be traced across a variety of disparate texts, authors, and products. Examining how Fluffy Ruffles generated interaction in the pages of the Paris Herald provides the opportunity to observe how the mass popular press can be used as a tool to read across and bring together seemingly disparate authors, like Edith Wharton and Gertrude Stein, in their culturally responsive writing.

Gaby photo

Biography

Gaby Fletcher is a PhD candidate at the National University of Ireland, Galway and is an Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholar. Her thesis considers how Djuna Barnes, Gertrude Stein, and Edith Wharton respond to notions of the female ideal located in American social reform campaigns.

Other upcoming events for your diaries include our Online Book Club on Forgotton Transatlantic Literary Women, on Wednesday 28th February, from 7-8pm. Join us on Twitter to share and discover underappreciated transatlantic women writers, with the hashtags #TLWBookChat and #ForgottenTLW! We also announce the winners of our International Women’s Day competition on the 8th of March, so get writing about your favourite International woman and submit your entries. Keep your eyes peeled for more details on our upcoming film screening and suffrage centenary event…

We looking forward to seeing you soon!

Saskia McCracken

 

 

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Always wanted to come to one of our book clubs but never quite managed to make it to University Gardens? Well, now you’ve got your chance! We’ll be hosting our first ever #TLWBookChat on Twitter next Wednesday, so you can get involved wherever you are! Continue reading “Everything you need to know about #TLWBookChat”

Edith Wharton Workshop

Wednesday 4 October, 2-5pm, Gannochy Seminar Room, Wolfson Medical Building,
University Avenue, Glasgow University.

Join us for a fun, informal, relaxed afternoon devoted to one of America’s most successful writers. However much or little you know about Edith Wharton and her work, this event is for you! Everyone welcome. The afternoon will feature talks, presentations, a quiz, film excerpts, brief readings of writing by and inspired by Wharton, alongside the results of our writing competition. And if all that isn’t enough, free refreshments and snacks provided!

Discussions will cover Wharton’s work in context, Wharton and feminism, modernism, her contemporaries, race, taste and design. Did you know that the author of Ethan Frome, The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country and The Age of Innocence (for which Wharton became the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction) was also a poet, a playwright, a renowned designer, an animal rights’ campaigner, and a woman honoured by the French government for her work in World War I? What about her attitudes to other writers, to women’s suffrage, to the homeland she left behind? Join us at the Wharton workshop to uncover and discuss more! The event programme can be found here: Wharton Workshop Programme.

Speakers include Katie Ahern (University College Cork), Ailsa Boyd, Anna Girling (University of Edinburgh) and Laura Rattray.

Enter the TLW Edith Wharton writing competition! Details available here.

This is a relaxed, informal event. You can join us for part of the workshop or for the whole afternoon. We’ll be posting a schedule a little nearer the event date, but in the meantime if you have any questions, send them our way. We look forward to seeing you there!

Transatlantic Literary Women: Series 2 Launch

The launch night will be on Tuesday 19 September, from 5.15 – 7pm, at Rooms 202 and 203, 4 University Gardens.

As promised, we’re on our way back! We’ve been busy prepping events for the second season of the Transatlantic Literary Women series and very much hope you’ll join us.

In 2016/17 we held a total of eleven events, from bookclubs to talks, workshops, creative writing events and our summer symposium with speakers from both sides of the Atlantic. We teamed up with organisations across Glasgow, including the fabulous Scottish Writers’ Centre, Northlight Heritage and Glasgow Women’s Library. We even headed into the trenches for our Transatlantic Women and War Day at Pollok Park! Many thanks again to those who supported the first season. Details of our events are available on this website and via our Twitter account @atlantlitwomen, where you can also listen to podcasts of symposium talks, recorded by the brilliant Jamie Loggie and Mark Cunningham.

We’re all back (Laura, Marine, Louisa and Saskia), along with two new members of the team: Kari Sund and Sarah Thomson. Welcome! Read about Sarah and Kari here and here.

Here are the details for our first event:

TLW Season Two Launch and Talk. Tuesday 19 September 5-15-7. Rooms 202 and 203, 4 University Gardens.

Join us for this friendly, social event: our season two launch AND a great talk! Wine, soft drinks and snacks available, plus thirty free copies of our bookclub choice, Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar to give away. And if this isn’t enough, we’re delighted to be welcoming Latinx expert Dr Eilidh Hall to give a talk ‘Spanglish as Resistance: Undoing Transatlantic Colonialism.’ We look forward to seeing you!

‘Spanglish as Resistance: Undoing Transatlantic Colonialism’ with Dr Eilidh A B Hall.

For many people in Latinx communities in the US, bi- or multilingualism is a part of everyday life. Simply put, Spanglish is a dynamic form of language made up of a conglomeration of Spanish and English dialects. And yet, to some, this is a threat to an ‘American’ culture that historically, and to this day, denies diversity and cultural complexity. This talk explores how, in an environment of intense hostility against people of Latinx heritage, Spanglish is used by activist women writers to resist the colonial erasure of their rich and diverse cultures.

Eilidh is a researcher interested in Latinx literatures and cultures. Her work focuses on Chicanx (Mexican American heritage) writings and the ways in which women negotiate their feminisms in patriarchal institutions. She is also co-jefa of The SALSA Collective, an online community for people interested in latinidades across the Americas.

Sandra-Cisneros
Sandra Cisneros, writer and artist
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Ana Castillo, a Mexican-American Chicana writer

For the diaries, our next two events are an Edith Wharton workshop on Wednesday 4 October 2-5pm, and our bookclub is on Tuesday 17 October at 5pm in the Gilchrist postgraduate club (entry open to all). Join us for an evening discussing Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar.

We’re looking forward to seeing you!

Transatlantic Magazine Cultures

Tuesday 23 May, 4 University Gardens, Room 202, 5pm

Please join us for the final regular talk in the 2016/17 Series. We’re delighted to be welcoming Dr Rachael Alexander of the University of Strathclyde on Tuesday 23 May to talk about her fascinating research on transatlantic magazines. (Yes, we’re talking Vanity Fair, Tatler and Vogue!) Rachael will be discussing transatlantic magazine illustrations and collaborations, with a special emphasis on the work of illustrator Anne Harriet Fish.

Exams will be over, so come and join us for a glass of wine, snacks and a great talk! Refreshments are available from 5pm. You can confirm your participation, chat about the event on our Facebook page.

As always, the event is free and open to all. The TLW team hope to see you there!

Give a Talk at the TLW Symposium!

Have you booked your tickets yet for the Transatlantic Literary Women Symposium on Saturday 3 June? Talks, workshops, lunch, and a friendly welcome await. And it’s all free! Reserve a place here.

We’re also looking for volunteers. As part of our afternoon workshop, “Vote for YOUR Transatlantic Literary Woman”, volunteers will be giving brief talks on their favourite transatlantic literary woman. She can be a figure from hundreds of years ago, or someone out there today, a transatlantic literary woman who has inspired you, achieved great things, and/or someone who has been forgotten and you want to bring out of the shadows. The choice is yours!

Continue reading “Give a Talk at the TLW Symposium!”