TLW Season 2_Twitter 17-08-20TeawithTLW
“Coming Home: Wharton’s War Stories”
Dr Alice Kelly
Wednesday 2 September, 5pm UK time

Please join us for the first of our new monthly Teas with Transatlantic Literary Women, when we’re delighted to be welcoming the brilliant Dr Alice Kelly, who’ll be talking about her hot off the press monograph Commemorative Modernisms: Women Writers, Death and the First World War (2020) and focusing for us, in particular, on Edith Wharton’s war stories.

Screenshot 2020-08-24 at 12.04.00Wharton, considered primarily a novelist of America’s Gilded Age, also wrote about strikingly contemporary political issues. This talk focuses on her wartime story ‘Coming Home’, published in the Christmas 1915 edition of Scribner’s Magazine. Although Wharton was never officially recruited as a propagandist, in ‘Coming Home’ she considers the public appetite for war stories and plays with different modes of wartime propaganda. Alice explores her use of the revenge narrative, a genre which enabled the textual enactment of readers’ fantasies of retribution. Revenge stories such as this one demonstrate established writers tackling the uncomfortable emotions and ethical justifications surrounding wartime death, and the difficulties of being aware of the human costs of American entry into the war. More broadly, this talk considers the ways in which transatlantic and other literary women dealt with the problem of the war dead.

To read the story in advance, you can find it here, pp. 45-97. (Not compulsory!)

If you’d like to join us, please email us at transatlantic.women@gmail.com and we’ll send you a secure Zoom link on the day.

We hope to see you there!
Team TLW: Laura, Chiara and Lindsay
#TeawithTLW


Alice Kelly is a literary and cultural critic based at the Rothermere American Institute at the University of Oxford. Her research focuses on early twentieth-century literary and cultural history in Britain and America. She is the author of Commemorative Modernisms: Women Writers, Death and the First World War (2020). She has previously published a critical edition of Edith Wharton’s First World War reportage, Fighting France: From Dunkerque to Belfort (2015), and various essays on modernist and First World War literature, including a previously unknown First World War story by Edith Wharton in the Times Literary Supplement. Find out more about Alice’s work at: https://www.dralicekelly.com/

@DrAliceKelly

 

 

 

 

Tea with TLW: Coming up in Autumn

TLW Season 2_Twitter 17-08-20

Team TLW Looking Ahead…

And that’s a wrap!

Wednesday saw our *fifteenth* and final summer #TeawithTLW, the Transatlantic Literary Women’s weekly series where we invited you to join us in covid lockdown and beyond for tea, cake, friendly chat, talks and TLW book club. It’s been a lot of fun, and we’d like to say a huge thank you toeveryone who’s been part of the series in any way.

While lockdown and travel restrictions mean we haven’t been able to meet in person, there are silver linings. The team has loved hosting the online series and we’ve been delighted to welcome TLW friends from Scotland, England, Wales, Ireland, the USA, Canada, France, Germany, Turkey, Greece, Italy, China and beyond…Thank you all for coming!

We don’t want to lose our new friends, so we’ll be keeping some of our programme online moving forward, even when restrictions are lifted. For now, though, everything has to be online. So, what’s next for TLW? With many of us gearing up for a new academic session – and for some it’s already underway – we’re moving now from a weekly Tea to a regular monthly Tea, with a few extra favourites (like Chiara’s  book club!) inbetween. We’ll keep the format, but will meet on the first Wednesday of every month at the slightly later time of 5pm in the UK. It’s the usual TLW mantra: informal, friendly, free. And yes, we still want you to bring tea and cake and your best virtual backgrounds!

In team news, we’ve really missed our TLW team-mate Anna this summer, and we hope she’ll be back with us soon. Good luck with the thesis Anna!

Our first new monthly #TeawithTLW is on Wednesday 2 September, 5pm, when we’re delighted to be welcoming the brilliant Dr Alice Kelly, who’ll be talking about her  hot-off-the press new book, Commemorative Modernisms: Women Writers, Death and the First World War. Please save the date, and we’ll post the details next week. We hope to see you there!

Team TLW: Laura, Chiara and Lindsay

#TeamTLW

Tea with TLW #15: Lindsay Middleton on ‘M.F.K. Fisher, Food, and Transatlantic Belonging’

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Tea with TLW #15
Lindsay Middleton on ‘M.F.K. Fisher, Food, and Transatlantic Belonging’
Wednesday 19th of August, 4pm UK Time. 

We can hardly believe that next week is the final weekly instalment of our Tea with TLW Summer Series, before we begin our fall semester programme. For our final talk, we are joined by one of the TLW Team, Lindsay Middleton, who will be rounding off the season with a tantalising discussion of the transatlantic food writer, M. F. K. Fisher (1908-1992).

In this informal paper, Lindsay will be using her literary analysis of food writing to focus on Fisher’s autobiographical text, The Gastronomical Me (1953). Born in Michigan, Fisher spent much of her life living in Europe, and is frequently lauded as one of the greatest food writers who ever lived. Her pleasurable, aesthetic and literary writing uses food as a way of understanding the human experience via pleasure, relationships and loss. While The Gastronomical Me demonstrates some of Fisher’s finest treatment of these themes, Lindsay will be focusing on the relationship between food and location within the text. Analysing the locations Fisher encounters, and the important journeys she embarks on between those locations, Lindsay will demonstrate how Fisher’s depictions of food and eating are inextricable from the transience and movement that defined much of her life. Ending our series with a truly transatlantic text, then, Lindsay will show how Fisher uses food to create a sense of personal belonging when she so frequently occupied the space between here and there.

We hope to see you for our final Tea with TLW instalment, and that you’ll join us for a friendly chat.
We also encourage you to bring tea and snacks, as this talk will certainly be whetting our appetites! Or perhaps even a glass of wine or G&T so you can join the team in toasting the end of our summer series.

If you’d like to join us, please email us at: transatlantic.women@gmail.com and we’ll send you a secure Zoom link on the day.

TeamTLW: Laura, Anna, Chiara and Lindsay
#TeawithTLW


Lindsay is a second year PhD candidate across the University of Aberdeen and the University of Glasgow. Her interdisciplinary SGSAH-funded project, ‘The Technical Recipe: A Formal Analysis of Nineteenth-Century Food Writing’, straddles English Literature and the History of Technology. Using a structural analysis of the recipe genre, Lindsay investigates how food writers in the nineteenth century used material food technologies as a way of situating themselves in culinary histories. She has written and presented on food adulteration, narrative cookbooks, the ideology of food and thrift, and tinned foods. Lindsay has published on the tinned foods as a disruptive technology and has a publication in progress addressing food adulteration in the 1820s. She is also currently engaged in internship work with the National Trust for Scotland that reimagines the way food features in historical properties.

Tea with TLW #14: Dr Virginia Ricard, ‘France between the lines of The Age of Innocence’

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#TeawithTLW14:  Wednesday 12 August, 4pm UK time
Dr Virginia Ricard, “France between the lines of The Age of Innocence

Please join us for our fourteenth TeawithTLW, when we’re excited to be joined by Dr Virginia Ricard. It’s the penultimate tea of our summer series, so don’t miss out!

In the centenary year of The Age of Innocence, Virginia will be inviting us to look – or look again – at Wharton’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel. Specifically, this talk will consider The Age of Innocenceas a book about France rather than New York. What interests Virginia is the way Wharton reverses the terms of “the international theme”, and how, seen in this light, the novel is a kind of footnote to Wharton’s long conversation with Henry James. But it also leads her to interpret the title and the meaning of “innocence” in a way that is more coherent with Wharton’s essays about France (French Ways and Their Meaning) and the United States (“America at War”). Come and join us to find out more!

Dr Virginia Ricard is Assistant Professor of English at Bordeaux Montaigne University. Her recent work on Wharton includes “Edith  Wharton’s French Engagement” in The New Edith Wharton Studies (2019), “The Uses of Boundaries: Edith Wharton and Place” in E-rea  (16.2 | 2019), “‘Isn’t That French?’’” in Edith Wharton’s The Age of  Innocence (2020), “Edith Wharton au tournant” in L’Amérique au tournant – La place des États-Unis dans la littérature française  (1890-1920) (forthcoming Classiques Garnier September 2020) and “Edith Wharton, Translator” forthcoming in Transatlantica (2021).  She is on the editorial board of the Edith Wharton Review and is currently working on an edition of Wharton’s correspondence with Charles Du Bos. She is co-editor of volume 29 of the Complete Works  (OUP).

If you’d like to join us, please email us at: transatlantic.women@gmail.com and we’ll send you a secure Zoom link on the day.
We hope to see you there!
TeamTLW: Laura, Anna, Chiara and Lindsay
#TeawithTLW

Tea with TLW #13: Dr Katrin Horn, ‘A Nineteenth-Century Gossip Network: Transatlantic Ties of Intimacy and Profit’

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Tea with TLW #13: Dr Katrin Horn, ‘A Nineteenth-Century Gossip Network: Transatlantic Ties of Intimacy and Profit’
Wed 5 August, 4pm UK time

Please join the team for our 13th #TeawithTLW! We’ll have our usual tea, cake and friendly discussion, and this week we’re excited to be joined by Dr Katrin Horn, who will be talking about her research on a fascinating nineteenth-century gossip network.

In her talk, Katrin will chart Charlotte Cushman’s (1816-1876) transatlantic network of female writers and artists. Actress Cushman emerged as one of the biggest stars of the nineteenth century – arguably not only because she was brilliant in her various Shakespeare roles (Romeo prominent among them), but because she was an immensely savvy influencer of her public image. During her 40-year career, Cushman managed to reconcile her fame for breeches roles with praise for her familial devotion, and her status as a symbol for middle-class respectability with her position at the head of an all-female household of expatriate artists in Rome.

Focusing on a small selection of Cushman’s carefully crafted private and professional network, Katrin will highlight the importance of gossip (both shared and withheld) for Cushman as well as the other women in her circle. These included, among others, sculptors Harriet Hosmer and Emma Stebbins, and writers Grace Greenwood and Anne Hampton Brewster. Whether they made their living as journalists or needed their name in the papers to attract audiences and buyers, all of these women were invested in the growing market for celebrity gossip and foreign correspondence. By reading excerpts from letters and diaries (the ‘private’ perspective) alongside biographical sketches and snippets of news (the ‘public’ perspective), this talk will untangle the intersections of public and private intimacies that characterized this network of path-breaking professional women.

Katrin’s talk is part of a larger research project on the uses of gossip in nineteenth-century US American print culture and life writing – about which you can read more at archivalgossip.com. And for TLW-ers who want to get a glimpse at some of the material Katrin is working with in advance, check out archivalgossip.com/collection

If you’d like to join us, please email us at: transatlantic.women@gmail.com and we’ll send you a secure Zoom link on the day.
We hope to see you there!
TeamTLW: Laura, Anna, Chiara and Lindsay
#TeawithTLW

Dr. Katrin Horn is an assistant professor at the University of Bayreuth (Germany.) She is currently working on a book manuscript on the uses of gossip in US American fiction, magazines, and life-writing of the late nineteenth-century.

Her research interests generally focus on gender studies, popular culture, and the history of knowledge. She is the author of Women, Camp, and Popular Culture –Serious Excess (Palgrave, 2017) and has co-edited a collection on US American popular music (transcript, 2015). Her most recent articles discuss “Gossip and Gothic Homes in Edith Wharton’s Fiction” (Edith Wharton Review) and “Intimacy in the Archive” (Anglia).

Tea with TLW #12: Dr. J Michelle Coghlan and a taster of The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food

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Tea with TLW #12
Dr J Michelle Coghlan gives a taste of The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food
Weds 29th July, 3pm UK time

If our #TeawithTLW series hadn’t done enough to whet your literary appetite already, then next week you are in for a treat. At the earlier time of 3pm we are being joined by Dr. Michelle Coghlan, who has edited the recently released Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food.  Michelle will be giving us a taster of the new volume, talking through the aims of the collection.

From medieval feasts in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales to “dude food” in contemporary food blogs, The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Foodoffers readers an expansive introduction to literary representations of gustation, gastronomy, agriculture and alimentary activism. But this Companion is equally concerned with telling the story of cookbooks as literature across a wide range of periods, from early modern receipt books to Black Power cookbooks in the 1970s (and beyond). In her informal talk, Michelle will discuss how this Companion came to be and some of what it has to say about reading cookbooks for pleasure, literary or otherwise.

We really hope that you can join us for this event, which is sure to get our stomachs rumbling! Be thinking of your favourite literary meal or cookbook for our discussion after the talk, and make sure you have enough snacks to see you through.

If you would like to join us, please email us at: transatlantic.women@gmail.com and we will send you a secure Zoom link on the day.
We hope to see you there!

TeamTLW: Laura, Anna, Chiara and Lindsay
#TeawithTLW

 


Dr. J Michelle Coghlan is Senior Lecturer in American Literature at the University of Manchester. She is the author of Sensational Internationalism: the Paris Commune and the Remapping of American Memory in the Long Nineteenth Century (Edinburgh UP, 2016), and editor of The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food (Cambridge UP, 2020). She guest-edited the Winter 2014 special issue, “Tasting Modernism,” for Resilience: A Journal of the Environmental Humanities and edited an edition of Kate Chopin’s The Awakening and Other Stories for MacMillan Collector’s Library in 2018.

Tea with TLW #11: Brad Bigelow on ‘The Eclipse of G. E. Trevelyan’

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Tea with TLW #11
Brad Bigelow, presenting ‘The Eclipse of G. E. Trevelyan’
Weds 22nd July, 4pm UK time

For our eleventh Tea with TLW, we are delighted to welcome Brad Bigelow who will be delivering a talk on ‘The Eclipse of G. E. Trevelyan’. Brad’s passion is for rediscovering and celebrating the work of forgotten writers. Through his Neglected Books website (https://www.neglectedbooks.com/), he’s written about hundreds of writers whose books have, for one reason or another, fallen out of print and are no longer read or discussed.

In this instalment of our series, Brad will talk about the life and work of Gertrude Eileen Trevelyan, who published as G. E. Trevelyan and who he considers the most unjustly neglected English woman novelist of the 20th Century. Trevelyan’s career began, ironically, with worldwide acclaim for becoming the first woman to win the Newdigate prize for the Best Composition in English verse by an undergraduate in 1927. She then went on to write eight novels of remarkable originality and stylistic and structural experimentation in the space of eight years. Injured when her flat was bombed during the Blitz, she died in early 1941 and her work utterly vanished from English literary history. Her name appears in no survey of the English novel and until 2018, none of her books was ever reissued.

Perhaps no other writer followed Virginia Woolf’s advice in A Room of One’s Own so closely. Born into a family of comfortable means, she had her £500 a year and a room of her own where, from 1931 until the night in October 1940 when a German bomb destroyed it, she did nothing but write and “to catch those unrecorded gestures, those unsaid or half-said words, which form themselves, no more palpably than the shadows of moths on the ceiling, when women are alone.” She did not do reviews, traveled little, had a small circle of friends, and worked outside the literary circles of her time. In some ways, her story offers a cautionary tale about the dangers of literary networks, both in their importance in assuring a writer’s posterity and their tendency to forget those writers who operate outside or on their peripheries.

As part of his continuing quest, Brad also asks that people come ready to discuss their own favourite neglected writers/books after his talk. So, get ready to join us on Wednesday with a cup of tea to listen to a fascinating paper and have some interesting discussion. In the meantime, start thinking about the forgotten writers you love, and perhaps have a look at Brad’s brilliant website for inspiration.

If you would like to join us, please email us at: transatlantic.women@gmail.com and we will send you a secure Zoom link on the day.
We hope to see you there!

TeamTLW: Laura, Anna, Chiara and Lindsay
#TeawithTLW

Tea with TLW #9: Shelby Judge on Kamila Shamsie, The Adaptation of Myth and Contemporary Displacement.

TLW Season 2_FacebookTea with TLW #9 
Shelby Judge on Kamila Shamsie, The Adaptation of Myth and Contemporary Displacement.
Weds 8th of July, 4pm GMT.

For our next instalment of #TeawithTLW, we have a very exciting talk from Shelby Judge, who will be discussing Kamila Shamsie, The Adaptation of Myth and Contemporary Displacement.

Moving our series into the 21st century, Shelby will be focusing on the work of Kamila Shamsie, a contemporary transatlantic literary woman. Shamsie was born in Karachi, educated in Amherst, Massachusetts, and is now a British citizen. Much of her writing has a focus on world travel and diaspora, often exacerbated and problematised for her fictional characters by real-world events. Shamsie’s novel Burnt Shadows (2009) exemplifies this, beginning in Japan at the end of WWII, before travelling to India on the brink of Partition in 1947, to Pakistan, and then to New York in the aftermath of 9/11.

Though Burnt Shadows is perhaps the best example of Shamsie’s focus on politically-active globetrotting, Shelby’s talk will focus more on Home Fire (2017) which reflects Shamsie’s own journey with its tripartite settings in Amherst, Pakistan, and London. Home Fire is a contemporary retelling of Sophocles’ Ancient Greek play Antigone, using the play’s renown themes of political and familial turmoil, and paying for the sins of one’s father, to explore issues of statelessness and citizenship for Muslims in modern Britain.

We are really looking forward to this timely discussion of belonging, alienation and the adaptation of classical literature to represent the contemporary experience.

If you’d like to join us for tea, please email us at: transatlantic.women@gmail.com and we’ll send you a secure Zoom link on the day.

We hope to see you there!

TeamTLW: Laura, Anna, Chiara and Lindsay
#TeawithTLW


Shelby Judge is a second year English Literature PhD student at the University of Glasgow. Her thesis topic is “Exploring contemporary women writers’ adaptation of myth for feminist purposes”. In this thesis, Shelby is researching what impact contemporary adaptations of Greek myth can have upon the feminist movement. Shelby’s overarching research interests are in feminist and queer theory and contemporary British and American women’s fiction. 

Shelby also runs a PhD-related blog: TheShelbiad.blogspot.com 

Tea with TLW #8: Quotes for Stephanie Palmer’s Talk on Turn-of-the-Century American Women Writers and British Reviewers

(Featured Image: Breakfast Time by Hanna Hirsch-Pauli, 1887)

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Tea with TLW #8: Stephanie Palmer on Turn-of-the-Century American Women Writers and British Reviewers.
Wed 1 July 2020, 4pm GMT.

This Wednesday at 4pm, the #TeawithTLW series continues with a talk from Dr Stephanie Palmer, based on her new book – Transatlantic Footholds: Turn-of-the-Century American Women Writers and British Reviewers. More information about the talk can be found here, and you can read more about the book here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/9780429261428

Prior to her talk, Stephanie has provided some quotations discussed in the book; only a few of them will be addressed on Wednesday, but feel free to read them below in order to whet your appetite before the discussion.

As usual, we are looking forward to seeing you, enjoying some tea and cake and having a fascinating discussion about transatlantic women’s writing. If you’d like to join us, please email us at transatlantic.women@gmail.com and we will send a secure Zoom link on the day.

We hope to see you there!

TeamTLW: Laura, Anna, Chiara and Lindsay
#TeawithTLW


‘As the reader passes through the various perspectives offered by the text, and relates the different views and patterns to one another, he sets the work in motion, and so sets himself in motion, too.’ – Wolfgang Iser, ‘Interaction between Text and Reader’

‘This is outwardly one of a class of books on which we look with the extremest aversion. It seems part of a pietistic literature, without knowledge, without an attempt at a scientific theology, the volumes of which are mostly a hash of texts in a nauseating Calvinistic sauce. Such little volumes are terrible when they come from Scotland, as do a vast number of them, but then we are not obliged to read them. If, on the other hand, they come from America, they are doubly terrible, because there is a certain fascination and freshness in almost all American prose writing which induces us to skim the pages to our intellectual harm and moral disgust. We have no doubt many of our readers sympathize with us, and if they should chance to take up “The Gates Ajar,” would lay it down all the more quickly if they saw “Sixth Edition,” or such and such a “Thousand,” on the title-page. For they have learnt by long and sad experience that popular theology is scarce worthy the name, and popular piety extremely irreverent.

‘But they would do Miss or Mrs. Phelps an injustice, and deprive themselves of a great pleasure, if they thus treated this singularly beautiful little book. If the buyers of all the editions really understood its drift, the creed of the people is in a far healthier state than we have believed it. If not, may many more thousands be sold, that the change may be wrought insensibly.’ – C. Kegan Paul, Review ofThe Gates Ajar, by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Theological Review, 1870

‘It is not given to a male writer thus to pourtray [sic] the very core and essence of a woman’s life—to penetrate into that innermost sanctuary wherein the greatest issues so frequently turn upon apparently infinitesimal causes!

‘Of the twenty-six almost perfect idylls of which the two volumes respectively entitled A Humble Romance and A Far Away Melody are composed but very few deal with the ordinary materials of romance, or concern themselves with the joys and sorrows of the conventional girl heroine and her lover.’

‘Story after story recounts the simple interests, the homely sorrows of the old, the poor, and the lowly, and deals with the lives of commonplace people. It is of their passionate attachments, of their profound tenderness, that the sketches tell. The exquisite sketch which gives its name to one of the volumes relates the story of two plain sisters, possessing no beauty of face nor any intellectual culture, who had walked hand in land for a long lifetime along a thorny road of humble duty, of homely toil, until the cruel moment of separation came at last. The story is full of poetry and pathos.’ – Review of A Far Away Melody, and Other Stories, A Humble Romance, and Other Stories, by Mary E. Wilkins, Shafts, 1890

‘We could not easily find a more powerful or pathetic love story than that of Alessandro and the beautiful “Señorita” [. . .] who has stooped to a suitor of such low degree. But the tale can scarcely fail to have another aspect for many of its readers. It is another voice of witness to the charge of monstrous cruelty and injustice on the part of the States to the Indian populations which have fallen under their power, a charge supported by testimony from all parts of the continent, and never, as far as we know, contradicted. It makes one’s blood boil to read of these wholesale robberies of land, held by a tenure really as good in equity as the most stringent conveyance, which citizens of the States have committed, and its Governments allowed. [. . .] Our record in the matter of native tribes is not blameless, but it does not approach the infamy of these proceedings.’ – Review of Ramona, by Helen Hunt Jackson, Pall Mall Gazette, 1885

‘In exciting here as profound and unflagging an interest as in “The House of Mirth” Mrs. Wharton must be credited with an even greater success. The tragedy of Lily Bart was that she was really fitted for a higher destiny than that of a social parasite. Here we have the deeper tragedy of a complete correspondence between character and destiny. Undine Spragg is the petted only child of a homely, well-off couple [. . .] Meanwhile Undine has come up against the blank wall of French aristocratic tradition, and has realized that there is no loophole there for American feminine arrogance. [. . .] Meanwhile the European reader is left in a state of perhaps illusory thankfulness that passionless, capricious, and ignorant monsters like Undine are as yet confined to the country that deliberately engenders them.’ – Review of The Custom of the Country, Glasgow Herald, 1913.

‘Who but a Sunday editor, undoubtedly the most easily startled of human beings, could feel the least surprise at this steady damnation of the American wife, whether by foreign observer or by native novelist? Take, for example, the British weekly magazines. Years ago they formed the habit of exposing her and they would no more dream of leaving off now than of omitting the article on “What the Birds Are Doing in Devonshire.” Time and again they have burst out upon the American woman all at once, as when one Dr. Andrew McPnail, some three years ago, called her a Hanoverian rat, a San Joséscale, a noxious weed, a jade, a giantess, and a potato-bug, and was immediately copied approvingly by the other British magazines, and widely quoted on the Continent.’ – F.M. Colby, ‘The Book of the Month’, North American Review, 1914.

Tea with TLW #8 – Dr. Stephanie Palmer on Transatlantic Footholds: Turn-of-the-Century American Women Writers and British Reviewers

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#TeawithTLW8 – Dr. Stephanie Palmer on Transatlantic Footholds: Turn-of-the-Century American Women Writers and British Reviewers
Wed 1 July, 4pm UK time
A huge thank you to everyone who’s been to our #TeawithTLW events taking place this summer. It’s been great fun–and the team has loved welcoming everyone on Wednesday afternoons for tea, friendly chat, bookclubs and talks. One advantage of us having to head to Zoom for our meets this summer has been the chance to host TLW friends from all over the world!

After seven weekly events, we’re taking a one-week midterm break. We’ll be back though, on Wed 1 July when we look forward to welcoming Dr. Stephanie Palmer to talk about her new book, Transatlantic Footholds: Turn-of-the-Century American Women Writers and British Reviewers. This is right up Team TLW’s research street!

In her book, Stephanie analyses British reviews of American women fiction writers, essayists and poets between the periods of literary domesticity and modernism, and explores the ways in which reviewers read American women as literary artists, as women and as Americans. While their notion of who counted as “women” was too limited by race and class, reviewers eagerly read these writers for insight about how women around the world were entering debates on women’s place, the class struggle, religion, Indian policy, childrearing, and high society. In the process, by reading American women in varied ways, reviewers became hybrid and dissenting readers. Writers discussed include Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Helen Hunt Jackson , Zitkala-Ša and Edith Wharton. Join Stephanie and TeamTLW on 1 July to find out more!

Further information on Stephanie’s book can be found here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/9780429261428

If you’d like to join us for tea, please email us at: transatlantic.women@gmail.com and we’ll send you a secure Zoom link on the day.

We hope to see you there!

TeamTLW: Laura, Anna, Chiara and Lindsay
#TeawithTLW