The TLW Podcast Episode 6: Your Transatlantic Literary Woman

Hi all!

Thank you so much to those of you who turned up for our launch last week! It was fantastic to see so many of you, and we look forward to many more events in the future, starting with our Edith Wharton workshop on Wednesday 4 October.

Our sixth podcast is here. Tune in for short talks on Nella Larsen, Claudia Rankine, Rosalía de Castro, and Clarice Lispector, as well as an exclusive interview with Carly Brown. Carly and Wheezy Whispers’ Mark Cunningham discuss creativity and the role of workshops for writers and artists. Enjoy!

As ever, we are very thankful to Jamie Loggie and Mark Cunningham for all their hard work. If you are curious about any of the writers mentioned in this and last week’s podcast episodes, don’t forget our transatlantic reading list, for suggestions of books and poems to check out.

This week, we also say welcome to a new team member: meet Margarida Cadima, who will be helping us to organize the series from now on, and has already created a fabulous Edith Wharton quiz.

All best wishes,

The TLW Team.

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TLW Podcast: Episode 4 – Sylvia Plath and You

Dear all,

Here is the fourth episode of our podcast! This week is dedicated to Tracy Brain’s talk on ‘Sylvia Plath and You.’ Enjoy and feel free to share this episode, and to send us your comments and suggestions!

Best wishes,

The TLW Team.

PS: For updates on our podcast and events, but also information about upcoming deadlines, calls for papers and useful resources, remember to subscribe to our newsletter!

The TLW Podcast: Episode 3 is here!

Dear all,

How are you enjoying the TLW podcast so far? After Melanie Dawson’s talk on age and modernity in last week’s episode, we present you our third podcast episode, dedicated to Professor Gary Totten’s talk on African American women writers Jessie Redmon Fauset  and Ida B. Wells. Both women travelled to Europe and used their transatlantic experience to inform their travel writing, which challenged negative stereotypes about African American populations, at a time of increased racial violence. This week, we listen to Gary talking about his research on their work, and then to an interview with TLW’s attendee and Edith Wharton specialist Anna Girling. Enjoy!

Best wishes,

The TLW team.

Symposium Podcast: Episode 1

Finally, it’s here! We are delighted to release the first episode of the Symposium podcast, recorded at Glasgow Women’s Library in June! Whether you attended the event or not, this will be a great opportunity to (re)listen to some great talks, and to hear some exclusive interviews from some of our guest speakers and from the series founder, Laura Rattray herself!

This first episode will give you an idea of the content of our series, and serve as an introduction to the rest of the podcast. We hope you enjoy it, and look forward to hearing your thoughts about it!

None of this would have been possible without our podcast experts, Mark Cunningham and Jamie Loggie, who recorded, edited, and masterminded the production of these episodes. Read on to find out more about their work!

A word from the creators: Mark Cunningham and Jamie Loggie

Hello, Mark and Jamie here!

Our audio content company, Wheezy Whispers, recorded and produced the Transatlantic Literary Women Podcast.

Our main focus is creating and running podcasts for Scottish arts organisations, businesses and charities. We capture the events, stories and soundscapes of these marvellous institutions and turn them into something that expands their content marketing strategy and helps them engage differently with their ever increasing digital audience.

However, we also enjoy working on radio programs, documentaries, oral histories, soundscapes and more!   

We are also currently developing the SWC Podcast with the Scottish Writers’ Centre. We’re creating an audio collection of masterclasses, interviews and performances, all from events brought to you by the Scottish Writers’ Centre.  You might hear a mention or two of this in our TLW podcasts.

We actually first met Marine and Saskia at an SWC event and subsequently, we’ve had the pleasure of getting to know the TLW team. We are now excited to say that we’re bringing the TLW podcast series to your ears!

Not only is the TLW podcast our very first public podcast which makes this a special one at that. But moreover, we’ve been supported and treated wonderfully by the TLW and their superb work is something that really deserves to be archived and experienced again.

Also, we must give a personal thank-you to Marine Furet for keeping us updated, contributing and helping to coordinate this podcast series.

We’re seeking to emulate what our favourite radio stations and podcasts provide for their listeners: comfort, escapism, excitement, understanding, new perspectives and that feeling of having spent your time in the best possible way – all for a Scottish audience.

We want to connect with this Scottish audience, to have something that goes beyond the radio dial or the subscription button so instead of this audience outgrowing the content created, we grow together.  

We can’t wait to see your feedback and there’s nothing left to say but thank you and happy listening!

Mark & Jamie

If podcasting sounds like your thing, let’s talk!

Email us at info@wheezywhispers.co.uk


Ps: If you’d like to receive an email when a new episode is out, you can subscribe to the TLW newsletter, and get the latest information on our forthcoming events!

Transatlantic Reading List

The Transatlantic Literary Women symposium left us with a huge list of summer reads, so to tide you over the summer break we’ve compiled a handy book list full of transatlantic women writers!

First up was Melanie Dawson’s talk on Age-Conscious Modernity. Melanie examined changing and conflicted attitudes towards the experience of age and ageing. Edith Wharton’s Summer is a fantastic exploration of the power dynamics in relationships between young women and older men, and Zora Neale Hurston dignifies the experience of ageing in Their Eyes Were Watching God.

Next, Gary Totten presented ‘Transatlantic African American Women Writers and Racial Justice in the Age of Jim Crow’. If you’re interested in African American female travel writing, Crusade for Justice: The Autobiography of Ida B. Wells and Jessie Redmon Fauset’s columns in The Crisis are must reads. Both writers politicised their form in order to present a social critique of the violence and social limitations of the Jim Crow era, though in very different ways.

After lunch, Tracy Brain presented ‘Plath and You’. As well as more famous novels such as The Bell Jar, Tracy reminded us of Sylvia Plath’s (often overlooked) poetry. You can find a selection of her poetry here.

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Later in the afternoon, Claire Heuchan led a workshop on the connections between UK and US Black feminist writing. She touched on Jackie Kay’s Red Dust Road, Claudia Rankine’s Citizen, Audre Lorde’s Sister Outrider, and the Bare Lit Anthology. Plenty to get your teeth into!

And finally – YOUR transatlantic literary women! This was where we gave participants in the symposium an opportunity to make a case for their favourite transatlantic women writers. Zelda Fitzgerald’s Save Me the Waltz and Nella Larsen’s Passing were both championed, as was work by Leonora Carrington, Clarice Lispector, and the Galician poet Rosalia de Castro.

Whether you attended the symposium, or you’re just looking for something to read, there should be plenty here to get you started. If you have any other suggestions, feel free to share them with us! Happy reading!

By Louisa Burden.

Burns Night Woolf Supper at Glasgow Women’s Library: A Taste of Things to Come

Plans are underway for a fabulous Transatlantic Literary Women event at Glasgow Women’s Library in June. Here’s a taster of the last event I went to there, and what we might expect to see as part of the TLW series in the summer. Looking forward to it!

This time last week I was enjoying the fabulous #herland Burn’s Night Woolf Supper at Glasgow Women’s Library. There are many alternative Burns nights in Glasgow, but this was unmissable. Robert Burns and Virginia Woolf share the same birthday, a fascination with Mary Queen of Scots, and much more besides. One line in Woolf’s feminist tract A Room of One’s Own stands out – or should I say blazes out? – in particular:

‘Yet genius of a sort must have existed among women as it must have existed among the working classes. Now and again an Emily Brontë or a Robert Burns blazes out and proves its presence.’Virginia Woolf

The Herland event took the connections between Woolf and Burns as a prompt for night of poetry, music and feasting. We gathered in the library dressed in our best ‘Bloomsbury with a Burns twist’. Picture women in feathered hats, wearing creative fusions of tartan, tweed and sweeping patterned shawls. Library volunteers have decorated the room in suffragette colours with thistle-like patterns that evoke the work of Woolf’s sister, artist Vanessa Bell. One wall exhibits Woolf’s book covers (some are even projected, in purple, green and white, on the ceiling), with smatterings of pamphlets on Woolf’s connection to Scotland. I’m delighted to have had the opportunity to display my own Woolf/Burns cut-up book art. Our salonnieres for the evening are poets JL Williams (dressed as a wolf) and Jane Goldman (with thistle-purple hair). The tone is set for a unique event.

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Courtesy of Jane Goldman

Throughout the evening we have a feast of wonderful performances. Rahat Zahid ‘blazes out’ with her translations of Woolf and Burns into Urdu. Nuala Watt blazes out with her polyvocal poetry and singing. Poet Lila Matsumoto plays the fiddle as she leads us into the reading room where we enjoy a delicious Malaysian buffet from Julie MacLeod’s Street Kitchen. Then Sophie Collins shares an autobiography-poem inspired by Woolf’s Orlando, followed by a trio of local poets (above) who take full advantage of Mrs Dalloway rhyming with Galloway. Performer and writer MacGillivray gives a blazing performance that fuses electric harp, mermaid song and sound recordings of Mary Queen of Scots’ old haunts.

Although the supper is not a transatlantic event, it still forms a bridge, between Woolf’s England and Burns’ Scotland. The event also reaches across time: Burns was born in 1759, Woolf, on the same day in 1882, and both of them are channelled through our contemporary performers. It makes sense then, that we’ll be reaching across the Atlantic at Glasgow Women’s Library this summer.

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Courtesy of Jane Goldman

Put June the 3rd in your diaries, for the summer extravaganza of the Transatlantic Literary Women series. There will be music and food. There will be poetry, talks and workshops. There will be keynote papers given by Professor Melanie Dawson (William and Mary College, USA) on ageing, advertising and modernity, and by Professor Gary Totten (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) on African American women travel writing. You’ll have the chance to nominate and give a pitch for your transatlantic literary woman of the year (perhaps even dressed in your own TLW inspired get-up). We’re looking forward to a day of translatlantic voices, blazing out! See you there – sláinte!

In the meantime, see you at our Transatlantic Modernisms Workshop on Wednesday and don’t forget to submit to our Creative Writing Student Showcase by February the 14th. We look forward to hearing your work on the 28th!

By Saskia McCracken